VOLUNTEER WITH US AT SHANTI BHAVAN!

This Spring, we are sending a team of 10 Volunteer Teaching Artists to Shanti Bhavan Children’s Project in Southern India to deliver a multi-week arts camp that focuses on Music, Filmmaking, Dance, Visual Art, and Musical Theatre!

Shanti Bhavan Children’s project is a residential school for children from India’s lowest castes. At this camp, you will dive head first into your craft while creating a space filled with fun for you and the children of Shanti Bhavan. Days can be filled with journaling, water balloons, crafting, tea breaks, and long rehearsals, all working towards three evenings of Graduation performances. That’s three nights of fun and celebration that you will never forget!

ASTEP Volunteer Teaching Artists create a space where it is fun to practice communication, collaboration, empathy, and creativity. Join us in bringing arts education to these children and create memories that will last a lifetime!

APPLY NOW!

Dates: May 20 – June 10 (with an optional retreat May 18-20)

Application deadline: March 1

Location: Shanti Bhavan Children’s Project, just outside of Bangalore

Who: You! All artists with a passion for making a difference!

People of color, LGBTQ+, those with disabilities, and anyone excited to work with us are strongly encouraged to apply.

** Room and board is provided by ASTEP and Shanti Bhavan for all Volunteer Artists

** Email Sami Manfredi at sami@asteponline.org or give us a ring at 212.921.1227 to learn more!

Singing You Home – A Benefit Album

Artists Striving to End Poverty is so proud to be a part of this new project –Singing You Home.

Produced by Laura Benanti, Mary-Mitchell Campbell & Lynn Pinto, all proceeds of this bilingual album of lullabies will be donated to RAICES & ASTEP. We hope you will join us in supporting these children and families, separated at the southern border of the United States. Learn more here.

Click here to pre-order the album.

 

 

Marcus Crawford Guy’s blog: BACK TO SCHOOL


Marcus Crawford Guy, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about his experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP on STAGE! This program gives over 1,500 NYC youth access to the transforming power of the arts by bringing performing and visual artists from the Broadway and NYC community to after-school and in-school programs. ASTEP on STAGE! partners with schools and community organizations serving youth affected by the justice system, incarceration, gun violence, homelessness, immigration status, systemic poverty, and HIV/AIDS. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #5:

BACK TO SCHOOL

 

I remember as a child (neurotic and high strung as I was even way back then) being so challenged by the routine that school brought as I returned at the end of each summer. I longed for days where I could play as I wished, where morning bled into noon and into night and be that guided by books, games, movies or time with family and friends, it was something I missed by the time the last week in August rolled around. I went to a school where we wore uniform: shirts, ties, belted pants and black shoes… ugh. Stifling.

But as I think about many of the kids I have met this summer at ASTEP’s partner sites, I am eager for them to get back into routine, to have new structure and to be given goals to work towards. The fundamental difference between my own free time and the free time of the students I work with being that I really didn’t have anything to worry about. Structure would be provided where needed but for the most part, I had more things to do than I had things to worry about.

For our student population, the equation is typically reversed. Time off often brings up the things that are absent in their lives. I had to actively remind myself of this in all of our workshops these past couple of months – intellectually I understood their experience (with a 26 year old brain) but to be living that in the mind and body of a 7 or 8 year old is completely incomprehensible. It made me particularly aware of moments when a teaching artist couldn’t understand why the students needed so much scaffolding around a particular concept. For the most part, their days are spent off without structure – and this likely only brings their life circumstances into focus more acutely. Their creative expressions within transitional housing complexes for example, aren’t always accepted as productive and so our task is to come in and not only be the bearers of fun, but also to present the structure in which that fun will be had.

So, with school back in session, I’m excited to return to many of these sites this fall and see familiar faces with brand new energy. Granted, its usually colored with the exhaustion of learning at the end of a school day but this allows our function to be different, providing fun, freedom of expression and creativity at the end of a rigorous day, which, of course, then presents a whole other set of challenges!

 

 

ASTEP Featured on Common Good!

 

We are excited to announce that ASTEP is featured on Common Good, a new website from Newman’s Own Foundation!

This site is dedicated to sharing the powerful pursuits of nonprofits all over the world, and the everyday good that is often overlooked.

Check out our story here.

 

 

Rachel Kara Perez’s blog: Each day


Rachel Kara Perez, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about her experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP on STAGE! This program gives over 1,500 NYC youth access to the transforming power of the arts by bringing performing and visual artists from the Broadway and NYC community to after-school and in-school programs. ASTEP on STAGE! partners with schools and community organizations serving youth affected by the justice system, incarceration, gun violence, homelessness, immigration status, systemic poverty, and HIV/AIDS. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #5:

September 5, 2018

Each day

My padrino tells me, obsessing over the past is what breeds depression. Fixating on the future is what breeds anxiety. That we can only truly ever appreciate and have a life well-lived if we focus our energy on the present, allowing ourselves to be fully here and now.

In this work, and especially in this mighty city, it is easy to find excuses not to follow this thoughtful and somewhat sage advice. The trains are late, we are waiting for our next check, one of the children may be gone next week, new sets of expectations, someone is late, we didn’t get that gig…the list is long.

Working with refugee youth, and specifically unaccompanied minors during my time with ASTEP has granted me a different relationship with impermanence. It came almost all at once, as I spoke to a fellow teacher from the Refugee Youth Summer Academy about my work at our site with Lutheran Social Services. I expressed my struggle with endings, how saying goodbye (or harder still, not being afforded an opportunity to say goodbye) never got easier with this work, how I had cried and not known how to channel that sorrow after a child leaves, especially when they’ve been at LSS for a long time and then one day are just not there anymore.

The advice she gave me was a total game changer. She suggested at the end of each class I take a moment to let the children know how much they mean to me. That way, even if I don’t have the opportunity to say an individual goodbye to each of them before they leave, I can rest assured that they know how I feel about them, that I believe in them, and that I care. Little did I realize how effective this would be and also how soon I would need to say a goodbye of my own.

I am moving on from ASTEP to further my work in arts activism, working full time for an arts and social justice organization. It’s a wonderful opportunity, and yet I will miss ASTEP dearly. Of course, I will find ways to collaborate and stay connected, always.

My last day with the children at LSS  I actually didn’t have a Volunteer Teaching Artist and was able to take the lead as opposed to offering on site support. It felt fortuitous. I threw them a little party, we had snacks, listened to music, and drew together. I took the advice of my colleague, and now friend, and explained that this was my small way of expressing my gratitude. That I wanted all of them to know that they are important. That whether we have been together one day, or two weeks, or seven months, that each day is special to me, and that I will always think of them. I told them the time I have spent with them has changed my life. I thanked them for their time and for their presence. And I thank everyone at ASTEP, for your support and encouragement, for the Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellowship, for the honor of carrying on this work for those who no longer can. And though I must say goodbye, please accept this modest writing as an expression of my gratitude, and know that each day was special to me.

Welcome to our newest staff member, Austin Sora!

 

We’re thrilled to announce that Austin Sora has joined the ASTEP staff as the Assistant to Development and Administration!

Find out some more about Austin in the interview below:


Name:
Austin Sora

Where did you grow up? Toronto, Canada

Where did you work before joining the ASTEP team? I recently moved back to New York after living in Dallas for three years, performing with Bruce Wood Dance. Administratively, I’ve worked with The Clive Barnes Foundation, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, and Bruce Wood Dance.

Have you been onsite with any ASTEP programs? Which ones? My first teaching experience with ASTEP was teaching dance at Women in Need (WIN) as part of the ASTEP on STAGE! program. I’ve also volunteered for ASTEP at the Refugee Youth Summer Academy (RYSA), in partnership with the IRC.

Did you have a background in the arts or teaching, when you started? I have been dancing my whole life, and I am fortunate to be able to continue doing it professionally. The first class I taught for ASTEP in 2014 was my first teaching experience! It was a wonderful introduction to teaching because I saw first hand how much the arts can empower and connect people.

What is the most challenging part of your work? The challenges of this job are in a way what I love most. I am asked to wear a lot of hats, which allows me to work in several different areas within the organization. It can be a challenge juggling a range of responsibilities, but I learn something new every day!

What is the most rewarding part of your work? ASTEP’s mission is one that I believe in strongly, and I love coming to work each day knowing that I am playing a small part in bringing the arts to so many children in the US and abroad.

What do you look forward to, each day, working at ASTEP? The ASTEP community is made up of a special group of people, whose generosity and passion inspires me each day.

What song best encapsulates your working personality? “Happy” by Pharrell Williams! 🙂

 

 

 

It’s the most wonderful time of the year!

Ring in the holiday season with us! Mark your calendars for the 10th Annual New York City Christmas: A Concert to Benefit ASTEP.

Conceived, produced and music directed by Drama Desk-nominated orchestrator Lynne Shankel (Cry-Baby, Altar Boyz, Allegiance), the evening will feature Broadway’s most sought-after talent, putting their spin on your holiday favorites. Past performers include Sierra Boggess, Raul Esparza, Derek Klena, Lindsay Mendez, Andy Karl, Orfeh, and more!

Monday, December 10
7:00PM
Joe’s Pub at the Public Theatre

Tickets: $75 | $100 | $125
Sponsorships available at various levels

 

ALL proceeds from ticket and album sales will support ASTEP’s mission of connecting performing and visual artists with underserved youth in the U.S. and around the world. Together, we give kids access to the transforming power of the arts!

Email Katherine Nolan Brown at katherine@asteponline.org to be notified when tickets are available for purchase, or for information about sponsorships.

 

 

Pablo Falbru’s blog: We Started From The Bottom Now We’re Here


Pablo Falbru, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about his experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP at Refugee Youth Summer Academy. A team of 13 ASTEP Volunteer Artists lead the creative arts classes at the Refugee Youth Summer Academy, which supports the personal growth, cultural adjustment, and education of multicultural refugee youth and helps them successfully transition into the US school system. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #3

August 22, 2018

Week 6 | RYSA: We Started From The Bottom Now We’re Here

We’re in the home stretch of the Refugee Youth Summer Academy (RYSA). It has been quite an experience in all the good ways. As we gear up for graduation performances, the reality that my time with these amazing students is coming to an end starts to sink in. Seeing each class grow in confidence not only in the fundamentals of music, but in self-expression and vocabulary, has been an honor and a privilege.

The joy and excitement they have when they come into class reminds me of the power each of us has to impact someone’s life. My co-teacher Nick and I reflect on our classes at the end of each day and we are always blown away by how fast our students grasp the lessons. It inspires us to push ourselves in our own work outside of teaching. For me, it’s also a reminder that we have the capacity to grow and do more. And that we should set mindful intentions so that we can be the best version of ourselves.

One of the most heartwarming things that happened during the program was when a new
student was added to the class. There was always a “veteran” student that supported the new
kid. Helping them get their bearings, teaching them what they knew and just being there to
support them. It’s adorable to watch and witness unbiased kindness really does something to
ya. I have no doubt that it’s going to be an emotional final week. I’m proud to have been a part
of their lives and feel blessed to experience their love and gratitude. I learned a lot from them
and will keep the joy, wonder and kindness they emanate in my heart.

We could all learn something from the innocence of a child. Some of these kids have had
experiences that I couldn’t imagine having to go through. Yet, they are full of love, excitement
and understanding. If more adults had this mindset, the world would be a better place. So thank
you, students of RYSA. You have made me a better man. And thank you to the administrators
of the Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellowship for the opportunity to grow, give back and
honor Jennifer’s legacy.

Be loved, inspired and live your best life,

Pablo Falbru

Brigid Transon’s blog: The Adventure Continues


Brigid Transon, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about her experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP at Refugee Youth Summer Academy. A team of 13 ASTEP Volunteer Artists lead the creative arts classes at the Refugee Youth Summer Academy, which supports the personal growth, cultural adjustment, and education of multicultural refugee youth and helps them successfully transition into the US school system. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #2:

August 22, 2018

RYSA: Week 4

Hello this is Brigid again. I cannot believe that RYSA is four weeks in! This summer has flown. Before RYSA I could not have imagined how fast this summer would go by.

This past week was one of my favorite days at RYSA. It was international food and fashion day, students brought in food from their home countries and wore traditional clothing. It was incredible to see all of the students feeling proud and walking across the stage.  Not only were the students proud, but the cheers ringing through the audience created an amazing culture of support.  After the fashion show I could not help but smile
for the rest of the classes that day!

More from RYSA since my last post includes incredible creativity seen through the dance class.  Each and every one of the 6 classes of students choreographed their own dances with various levels of support. For the youngest students we divided them into two groups and had them pull cards with movement on them. The students then got to make the card their own. For example, the card may have said jump, then I would ask the student what kind of jump we should do as well as how many. The oldest students started by working in small groups. Each group chose four movement cards and making a dance with these four movements. From there they added their own movement.  Once the groups were solid we combined groups, making the dance longer and longer!

I am extremely excited while simultaneously dreading the last weeks at RYSA. I cannot wait for the students to show off in the talent show and showcase their creativity and art during the graduation ceremony. I am dreading the ending because I will miss the students, the positive environment and my coworkers. There is an incredible feeling of family that exists at RYSA, and I am thrilled to be a part of it.

 

Pablo Falbru’s blog: This Is How We Do It


Pablo Falbru, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about his experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP at Refugee Youth Summer Academy. A team of 13 ASTEP Volunteer Artists lead the creative arts classes at the Refugee Youth Summer Academy, which supports the personal growth, cultural adjustment, and education of multicultural refugee youth and helps them successfully transition into the US school system. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #2:

August 22, 2018

Week 3 | RYSA: This Is How We Do It

Ahoy! Pablo here, feelin’ and doin’ and movin’ and groovin’. We are now halfway through the Refugee Youth Summer Academy and my oh my, how the time flies! Thinking back to how I felt after week one, when a day of classes felt like a three hour nonstop performance. There’s a noticeable difference in my energy, as well as the kids. I’m feeling conditioned for the back to back classes, while the students are feeling complacent and trying to test boundaries. But the good thing is, aside from typical kid outbursts, they are very respectful and comply when being called out on their behaviour. All in all, it seems like they enjoy being there. You can see it on their faces that they’re excited to come to class and participate. And I love that they are more comfortable expressing themselves and gaining confidence with the material.

I start every class with a few simple warm ups, i.e. face stretches and lip trills. In the beginning
of the program there were a few students who couldn’t really do the exercises. After
encouraging and modeling the exercises along with their peers and mentors, they started
getting better at it. It sounds like a small thing but some of the main goals of the program is to
promote confidence and a growth mindset. Giving them this small win at the start of class
makes them feel good and translates to more confidence throughout the lesson. That
confidence shows as more and more kids are raising their hands to ask and answer questions.
They are proud that they know what we are talking about in class. One of my favourite things is
after a weekend off from classes, they come in saying the music vocab terms from the week
before. It’s awesome that they remember these words and the definitions. Even if they don’t
remember parts of the terms, they try hard to figure it out, often using synonyms which I have to
give credit for.

As we jump into the second half, I’m excited to start working on our final performances. I’ve
been incorporating a small performance called “ImprompTunes” at the end of each class to get
them used to being in front of people. The goal of the activity is to create a song on the spot
using what we learned that day. So they pick the qualities of the song (i.e. Forte/Piano,
Presto/Largo, Legato/Staccato etc.) they pick the key and they suggest words that can be used
as lyrics. I lay down the foundation and they add onto it until we have something that resembles
a tune. It’s probably their favourite activity. Most are intrigued by the gear I have and a few just
like the opportunity to be in front of the class and all the attention. It’s a fun way to show them a
tangible example of the days lesson and review all of the ideas we’ve covered during the
program. We shall see how this all translates to the final performance! Until then…well, until my
next Blog Post, be well, be inspired and live your best life, namaste.

~Pablo Falbru

Footer background
165 W.46th Street, Suite 1303, New York, NY 10036
info@asteponline.org
(212) 921.1227

Drop us a line

Yay! Message sent. Error! Please validate your fields.
Clear
© 2015 Artists Striving To End Poverty. All rights reserved.