September in Shanti Bhavan!

Join us! ASTEP is getting ready to send a team of 12 artists next month to deliver an arts intensive camp to the students of Shanti Bhavan Children’s Project – a residential school for economically and socially disadvantaged children outside Bangalore, India.

“You have a choice about how to see the world. There is no limit to what you can do.”

We are looking for artists to lead Musical Theatre, Filmmaking, Dance, Music, Visual Arts, and Storytelling classes to help this camp thrive. Be a part of our team that brings the beauty and power of the arts to this very special community! 

Email Sami Manfredi at sami@asteponline.org or give us a ring at 212.921.1227 to learn more!

Dates: September 5th – 17th, with an optional retreat September 3-5th

Location: Shanti Bhavan Children’s Project, just outside of Bangalore, India

*Room and board is provided by ASTEP and Shanti Bhavan for all Volunteer Artists.

 

 

Rachel Kara Perez’s blog: An Ode to Lesson Planning


Rachel Kara Perez, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about her experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP on STAGE! This program gives over 1,500 NYC youth access to the transforming power of the arts by bringing performing and visual artists from the Broadway and NYC community to after-school and in-school programs. ASTEP on STAGE! partners with schools and community organizations serving youth affected by the justice system, incarceration, gun violence, homelessness, immigration status, systemic poverty, and HIV/AIDS. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #4:

August 3, 2018

An Ode To Lesson Planning

Much of being an Arts Educator is about doing your best to prepare in advance, have a plan of action, and also be open to throwing that away and having multiple backup plans in case the lesson takes an unexpected turn. With flexibility and room for creativity, one can navigate a class and shape it based on the children directly in front of them. Preparation, abandon, improvisation, systematic approaches, being open to surprises. It’s a constant balancing game between having plenty of tools and plenty of flexibility in the event of cut time, extra time, changed time, interruptions, latenesses, etc. Depending on the setting, depending on the partnership, no class looks exactly the same.

In addition to continuing my work at Lutheran Social Services with our Unaccompanied Minors Program, this month I have also joined the ASTEP staff at The International Rescue Committee’s Refugee Youth Summer Academy (RYSA). There I am the Lead Teacher in Storytelling. At this particular site we are preparing the children for public school in the fall, while incorporating English Language comprehension into our lessons. It’s been an incredible experience and I can’t believe we’ve already hit the halfway mark!

RYSA differs from the Lutheran Social Services site in that I am not working with the children in their native languages (at Lutheran Social Services all classes are taught in Spanish). That is a different set of challenges and I am so grateful to have the opportunity to experience both.

Lesson planning plays a crucial role at both sites. RYSA is a framework where we work to establish a more traditional school culture in an effort to prepare students for public school. At Lutheran Social Services, the volunteer Teaching Artists are afforded more freedom within their lesson plans, and each lesson is built to stand alone as opposed to at RYSA, where we plan for 6 weeks all while keeping in mind that it will culminate in a brief final performance.

It’s a different set of stressors and expectations but the ultimate goal remains the same: to use the arts as a means to uplift, educate, and inspire the youth. In all of our classes we work to share a joy, to provide tools for critical thinking, self reflection, imagination, and exploration.

Lesson plans are never anyone’s favorite part of teaching I don’t think, but they are helpful in organizing one’s thoughts and approaches to a particular class or project. They serve as a roadmap and a guide and even a script at times. Being an educator is not easy; it takes a lot of energy, focus, and social awareness to do it successfully and meaningfully. The different approaches to lesson planning have taught me a lot, and while there has definitely been a learning curve with adapting to different sets of expectations, I have more skills to include in my tool belt. While seemingly small, the concept translates into a larger one: having access to and the ability to offer different approaches each time I walk into a classroom is a kind of agency I hope to implement and pass on.

 

Marcus Crawford Guy’s blog: IF I’M NOT TEACHING AM I REALLY A TEACHER?


Marcus Crawford Guy, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about his experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP on STAGE! This program gives over 1,500 NYC youth access to the transforming power of the arts by bringing performing and visual artists from the Broadway and NYC community to after-school and in-school programs. ASTEP on STAGE! partners with schools and community organizations serving youth affected by the justice system, incarceration, gun violence, homelessness, immigration status, systemic poverty, and HIV/AIDS. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #4:

IF I’M NOT TEACHING AM I REALLY A TEACHER?

 

Whenever I take a few weeks to myself (in this case to galavant in Los Angeles) I’m anxious returning to the classroom. I’m not a teacher by training but by instinct and I so often get the fear of – DID I EVER KNOW WHAT I WAS DOING?

So last week as I geared up for 3 days of arts classes at housing shelters throughout the city, reviewing volunteer lesson plans, I really took the time to check in with myself. What is my role in this? How do I make a space where artists can thrive? And if I were the volunteer, or the student, or the partner receiving ASTEP workshops, what would I want?

A planner at heart, these questions actually helped me focus and quelled my anxieties. Potential blindspots found detail and I mapped out ways of helping teaching artists keep the seed of the lesson they had crafted, while ensuring that it would flow and have a hook for our student population, who are often antsy and lack focus (they’re kids!). I started to see the benefits of time away. It forced me to come back and look at the work with fresh eyes: to consider the WHY in everything I do and reconnect with ASTEP’s mission – to break cycles of poverty, where poverty is defined as a lack of choice. I made sure that, without giving kids free reign, they didn’t feel bound by the plan. They had space to be expressive, offer input and interpret activities in ways that helped them feel strong and valued.

In action, the week felt fresh, fueled and live! And as I reflect, I am reminded that this isn’t a job – it’s a service, it’s an offering and it’s a commitment to people and communities who are in need of support. If it stagnates with monotony or gets stuck on autopilot, the communities we partner with suffer. And as summer continues, I’m going to keep checking in with myself, seeing the detail, the room for improvement and challenging myself to best represent ASTEP’s A-Game!

 

Pablo Falbru’s blog: Some may say I’m a dreamer


Pablo Falbru, a 2018 Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellow, will be sharing monthly blog posts about his experiences teaching the arts through ASTEP at Refugee Youth Summer Academy. A team of 13 ASTEP Volunteer Artists lead the creative arts classes at the Refugee Youth Summer Academy, which supports the personal growth, cultural adjustment, and education of multicultural refugee youth and helps them successfully transition into the US school system. Through the arts, these young people learn they have what it takes to succeed no matter the obstacles, which is key to breaking cycles of poverty.


 

Blog Post #1:

July 17, 2018

Week 1 | RYSA: Some may say I’m a dreamer

Greetings! I’m Pablo Falbru, one of the recipients of the Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellowship. It is truly an honor to be selected for this Fellowship and contribute to the legacy of Jennifer. I was picked to be the head music instructor for the Refugee Youth Summer Academy (RYSA), and have been brimming with excitement since I got the call. We just finished week one of the program, though my journey started at the end of June. I spent the last weekend of June meeting and training with the ASTEP team, followed by a week of training with the RYSA Team. Over the course of that training period, the importance of this work grew even clearer for me.

The scope, circumstances and challenges that these kids face really puts our lives in the U.S. into perspective. Certainly we face our own challenges of poverty, violence, and oppression. But the sheer scale that this happens in the countries that the RYSA students come from is staggering. So first and foremost, this has been an opportunity to put my privilege in check. To reflect and be grateful for everyone and everything I have. And to practice infinite kindness and understanding of the students I teach, the strangers I meet and of my own friends and family.

As I mentioned, we just finished week one and I couldn’t have asked for a better start! I have three classes, each translating to roughly Kindergarten-1st Grade, 2nd Grade-3rd Grade and 4th Grade-5th Grade. In some classes, I could have as many as 4 different languages being spoken, not counting English. So that is hands down, the most challenging part of the job. But I’ve always been a fan of languages, so I’m using this as an opportunity to learn something new. As with any class, some students are stronger than others. So finding ways to empower and inspire each kid is a delicate balance. They have all responded well to everything I’ve put forth and it’s rewarding to see their eyes light up when something clicks.

One of my favourite things that happened this week was when a “challenging” kid from the K-1st class…(this student had been reprimanded earlier in the day in another class)…played the djembe with confidence and consistency. As he played I could see he had a natural talent for music, in particular rhythm, and he was so happy to show me what he could do. These are the moments that remind me of the transforming power of the arts. How a creative outlet presents an opportunity for the “challenged” to excel. To show the dimensions and range we have when given the space to explore and express freely. So for me, having the chance to cultivate that and create an environment that everyone can shine, makes my life all the more worthwhile. So thank you to the administrators of the Jennifer Saltzstein Kaffenberger Fellowship for the honor of carrying the torch that keeps the inspiring legacy of Jennifer alive, namaste.

~Pablo

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