New Direct Relief Program: Filling the Food Gap

“You are all doing exactly what the title of your organization says that you are doing.
You are: “Artists Striving to End Poverty.”
– Judy Juster, Clinical Coordinator/After School Program Director at Abraham House

Direct Relief Program - Filling the food gap

We are excited to share the news that ASTEP has started a food distribution program, Filling the Food Gap, in partnership with the Red Hook Container Terminal and the NYCEDC. This program provides direct service, food distribution, to one of our partners Abraham House located in the South Bronx.

Over the past month, donations of fresh vegetables, fresh fruit, poultry, and meat have been delivered to support the students that we serve, as well as their families and the greater community. Many people who received food were excited by the quality of the food, as well as the fresh poultry and beef, as the majority of donations have been canned goods. With this program, we have been able to provide 3 deliveries of fresh food to over 1,800 people!

Check out this NY Daily News article that features Mike Stamatis, the owner of the container terminal, and the impact these donations have had.

To help us to continue supporting the needs of the communities we serve during this difficult time, please consider a donation to ASTEP’s Arts Resilience Fund.

NYC Food Resources

We are proud to maintain longstanding relationships with incredible communities across New York City, made up of individuals affected by homelessness, HIV/AIDS, the justice system, and immigration status, among other challenges. We have seen through our partnerships that these communities are resilient, loving, and brave. Our students and their families are facing many obstacles during this pandemic, one of which is food scarcity.

If food scarcity is affecting you, your family, or your community, these resources may be able to help.

Free meals are available to every New Yorker at 400 locations
-Text ‘NYC FOOD’ or ‘NYC COMIDA’ to 877-877 to find food pick-up locations or for more information

Food for vulnerable and food-insecure New Yorkers
-The City has created the #GetFoodNYC Food Delivery Program to provide food for coronavirus-vulnerable and food-insecure New Yorkers not currently served through existing food delivery programs. This is a food delivery service for people who are unable to go outside for food. This program delivers two meals to each person in the household, every day.

One week of free groceries are available to all New Yorkers in five boroughs at the Neighborhood Opportunity Network (NeON) Nutrition Kitchens, in partnership with the Food Bank of NYC and the NYC Young Men’s Initiative (YMI)
-Learn More: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/neon/programs/nutrition-kitchen.page

These resources are available to anyone who needs food, regardless of age, student status, employment status, or immigration status.

 

 

Remote Lesson Planning: ASTEP Style!

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world: indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”
— Margaret Mead

These days, in an ever-changing world, we need to be adaptable and creative. Luckily, we are an organization of ARTISTS!

Last week, we collaborated with one of our New York City-based partner organizations as they prepared to dive into the new world of remote learning. This particular partner serves children who have recently arrived at the US border without an adult family member and who are awaiting resettlement, and all of our programming with them is in Spanish. Together, we created a plan to integrate the arts into their remote learning model through a series of “homework packets”. Thanks to our amazing Volunteer Teaching Artists, we were able to put together packets focused on storytelling, movement, creative writing, poetry, and visual arts in just a matter of hours.

Find out what our Volunteer Teaching Artists had to say about the experience:

“Last week I had been talking to a friend about how I wished there was something I could do for those kids, and the universe answered with Lizzy’s text! It was a crazy moment of serendipity. We talked through what she was doing, and I was blown away by ASTEP’s efforts in making this homework pack come true. I went through a few ideas on the phone based on classes I have taught before, and we came up with one in a manner of minutes. I typed it out, and sent it along! My heart really goes out to these kids who are already experience so much turmoil, and uncertainty. Just glad I was able to help in some small way!” -Susanna Stahlmann, Volunteer Teaching Artist

“Last Wednesday afternoon, I received a call with an excited Lizzy on the other line. In usual Lizzy fashion, she had an idea, and sprung into action. She contacted me and others, and shared her idea: a virtual class, complete with worksheets and multi-level learning, to assist our partner organization as they navigate distance-learning with both the younger and older students. We brainstormed the best ways to provide materials, and I chose to take the advice of Lizzy and create a virtual Yoga/Movement lesson, by way of storytelling about the environment and the outdoors (something that at the time I didn’t realize how much I would want connection with). I excitedly searched Google for black-and-white coloring pictures of people in specific yoga poses. I came up with an outline for a story we could tell with our bodies, and questions to ask to dig deeper for each part of the story. As the 4pm deadline drew near, I realized that with my focus on the younger class, I hadn’t dug into a reflection portion of the class for the older individuals. Lizzy was collecting a variety of worksheets and lessons from many different people and needed to send it off to our partner, and so I collected myself and practiced what I was putting on the page. I reflected, I breathed in (“Inhala”), I breathed out (“Exhala”), and thought of what questions I was asking myself. With GoogleTranslate pulled up to check spelling of Spanish translations and a list of Sanskrit words in another tab, and with a gentle reminder from Lizzy about the time, the worksheet was complete, save an upside-down exclamation point or two. I didn’t know what anyone else was doing, but submitted and hoped our partner would be able to feel supported through this time. Minutes later, I received an email with all of the lesson plans that were made in those few hours, and I was amazed. There were hand-drawn diagrams, and many, many pages of activities, ranging from coloring and creating to writing and reflecting, and with all of them, a feeling of fun and play and art. I was amazed. I am amazed. I knew our group of teaching artists at ASTEP was top-notch, and this continued to prove what I already knew: when we work together and share, even during difficult times, beautiful things can blossom.” -Will Thomason, Program Facilitator + Volunteer Teaching Artist

Click here and here to see some of the worksheets!

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Kelly Burns

This week, our Volunteer Spotlight is on Kelly Burns!

Why do you volunteer with ASTEP?
I volunteered with ASTEP because I loved their mission. Art education is so important, and art can be a powerful tool to grow community.

What is your favorite memory from an ASTEP program?
My favorite memory from this past summer is our first rehearsal with all of our sound equipment. After the last song ended they were best essay writing service jumping up and down with huge smiles. The students were able to hear what all of their practice and teamwork had turned into, and they were ecstatic to show everyone at the final performance.

Why is arts education important?
Arts education is important because it teaches confidence, empathy, creativity and imagination. The arts have the power to build the self esteem and spirit of a person, bring a community together, and inspire a greater world.

How has art impacted/inspired you?
The arts inspire me every day, from music that pumps me up in the morning to the great works of theatre that have changed my perspective on different issues. But most of all, the process of creating different types of art has brought me life long friends and colleagues and shaped me into who I am today.

What do you hope your students gain from your time with them?
When I work with students I want their biggest take away to be confidence. With ASTEP, many of the students I taught were sitting down with an instrument for the first time, and the first week of rehearsals I got a lot of “I can’t do this.” However, in the last few weeks we were having breakthroughs everyday. The best part of teaching is watching students work hard and achieve something they originally thought was impossible. I hope they learned that they are capable of anything.

What have you learned from your students?
This past summer my students taught me about community. My students ranged in age from 6 to 14 but they had no difficulty coming together and playing like a band. The younger students looked up to the older students, who found themselves in leadership positions. The community was incredible, as we had support from parents and other teachers from the first day of camp to the final performance. My students showed me just how much you can accomplish when you have the love and support of a community.

Any advice to share for new ASTEP volunteers?
My advice to future ASTEP volunteers is simply to have fun. If your students are working hard and enjoying themselves, then the art you create will reflect that.

Thank you, Kelly for your hard work and dedication! We could not do this work without you!